• A boy is looking for his toys in what is left of the family house, where the walls are full of gunshots.
  • Hamas supporters during the first demonstration after the war. Thousands of people walked through Gaza City and ended in the rubble of one of Hamas's top military leaders, Nizar Rayyan, who was killed in the early days of the war.
  • A young girl in the Az Seyafa area north of Beit Lahiya in Gaza City.
  • Mosques and muslim prayer halls have not escaped the relentless bombardment of Hamas targets in Gaza by Israel, which claims the Islamic militants misuse some of the holy sites as weapons depots and command centers. The Geneva Conventions says attacks on places of worship are war crimes.
  • In every corner of Gaza Zoo and in every cage lie dead animals. Before the war it was attracting families - the zoo drew up to 1000 visitors each day.
  • Nazek Al Kabari (right) have just returned to the ruins of his home, and the man and five of his eight children sit and drink tea in front of the house. Virtually the entire Abed Rabbo district in Jabaliya in Gaza City has been razed to the ground.
"What should we do? We have no money. We don't have anywhere else to live? All our savings are gone. God bless that none of us is hurt, but we have nothing left to live for."
  • Anywhere in Gaza, where Israeli soldiers made camp during the war, it has led to massive destruction. In Beit Lahiya a young man is digging for the remains of his mother's grave in the graveyard, which Israeli tanks have ploughed through.
  • Mohammed Derba will not get older than 21 years. The young Gaza fisherman lies braindead at Shifa hospital in Gaza City. His beard is neat and his chest raises and lowers itself as the respirator ensures that his lungs and heart function. But in a few days he will get infections. He will get pneumonia, and his heart rate will decrease and become erratic. And then he will die a natural death. Alone. Without a single family member by his side.
  • Everywhere in the worst affected areas in Gaza families come home to houses completely destroyed by Israeli soldiers. A family lives in the remains of their house in al-Atatra in Gaza City.

The Israeli-Hamas war lasted for 22 days, and in the wake of the ceasefire in the Gaza Strip, surviving Palestinians returned to homes crushed beyond repair and mourning of lost relatives. 13 Israelis and more than 1300 Palestinians were killed.
  • The narrow, secret tunnels used for smuggling goods, arms and people across the border at Rafah under the border between Egypt and Gaza. About 80 percent of the tunnels was supposed to be destroyed or damaged in the three-week Israeli airstrike of Gaza, but a week after they are in the process of being repaired. Ahmed, who will remain anonymous, is deep within a damaged tunnel to dig it out.
  • Two days after the war ended, shops and stalls started to reopen, as families returned to the totally bombed out central Gaza City.
  • For the first time in four weeks, the people of Gaza could go to Friday prayer without fear of bombs. Next to the ruins of the Al-Khalofa mosque in Jabaliya, Hamas spokesman Mushir Al-Masri spoke. The message was clear and predictable: Israel has not wiped out Hamas, Israel are cowards and the Islamic fighters are martyrs and heroes.
  • More than 4000 buildings are destroyed in Gaza and more than 20.000 severely damaged.
  • A house in Beit Lahiya is completely destroyed by Israeli soldiers. Refrigerators, computers and water tanks are shot to pieces, money and jewelry is stolen and the walls are painted with Hebrew graffiti and large Stars of David. The children immediately started to look for their toys.
  • The 22 day war has prompted most Palestinians to stop praying in mosques. Islamic scholars have issued a fatwa, or religious ruling, allowing Muslims to merge the five daily prayers to reduce the time spent in mosques.
  • A boy is looking for his toys in what is left of the family house, where the walls are full of gunshots.
  • Hamas supporters during the first demonstration after the war. Thousands of people walked through Gaza City and ended in the rubble of one of Hamas's top military leaders, Nizar Rayyan, who was killed in the early days of the war.
  • A young girl in the Az Seyafa area north of Beit Lahiya in Gaza City.
  • Mosques and muslim prayer halls have not escaped the relentless bombardment of Hamas targets in Gaza by Israel, which claims the Islamic militants misuse some of the holy sites as weapons depots and command centers. The Geneva Conventions says attacks on places of worship are war crimes.
  • In every corner of Gaza Zoo and in every cage lie dead animals. Before the war it was attracting families - the zoo drew up to 1000 visitors each day.
  • Nazek Al Kabari (right) have just returned to the ruins of his home, and the man and five of his eight children sit and drink tea in front of the house. Virtually the entire Abed Rabbo district in Jabaliya in Gaza City has been razed to the ground.
"What should we do? We have no money. We don't have anywhere else to live? All our savings are gone. God bless that none of us is hurt, but we have nothing left to live for."
  • Anywhere in Gaza, where Israeli soldiers made camp during the war, it has led to massive destruction. In Beit Lahiya a young man is digging for the remains of his mother's grave in the graveyard, which Israeli tanks have ploughed through.
  • Mohammed Derba will not get older than 21 years. The young Gaza fisherman lies braindead at Shifa hospital in Gaza City. His beard is neat and his chest raises and lowers itself as the respirator ensures that his lungs and heart function. But in a few days he will get infections. He will get pneumonia, and his heart rate will decrease and become erratic. And then he will die a natural death. Alone. Without a single family member by his side.
  • Everywhere in the worst affected areas in Gaza families come home to houses completely destroyed by Israeli soldiers. A family lives in the remains of their house in al-Atatra in Gaza City.

The Israeli-Hamas war lasted for 22 days, and in the wake of the ceasefire in the Gaza Strip, surviving Palestinians returned to homes crushed beyond repair and mourning of lost relatives. 13 Israelis and more than 1300 Palestinians were killed.
  • The narrow, secret tunnels used for smuggling goods, arms and people across the border at Rafah under the border between Egypt and Gaza. About 80 percent of the tunnels was supposed to be destroyed or damaged in the three-week Israeli airstrike of Gaza, but a week after they are in the process of being repaired. Ahmed, who will remain anonymous, is deep within a damaged tunnel to dig it out.
  • Two days after the war ended, shops and stalls started to reopen, as families returned to the totally bombed out central Gaza City.
  • For the first time in four weeks, the people of Gaza could go to Friday prayer without fear of bombs. Next to the ruins of the Al-Khalofa mosque in Jabaliya, Hamas spokesman Mushir Al-Masri spoke. The message was clear and predictable: Israel has not wiped out Hamas, Israel are cowards and the Islamic fighters are martyrs and heroes.
  • More than 4000 buildings are destroyed in Gaza and more than 20.000 severely damaged.
  • A house in Beit Lahiya is completely destroyed by Israeli soldiers. Refrigerators, computers and water tanks are shot to pieces, money and jewelry is stolen and the walls are painted with Hebrew graffiti and large Stars of David. The children immediately started to look for their toys.
  • The 22 day war has prompted most Palestinians to stop praying in mosques. Islamic scholars have issued a fatwa, or religious ruling, allowing Muslims to merge the five daily prayers to reduce the time spent in mosques.

Gaza devastated

2009

The Israeli-Hamas war lasted for 22 days, and in the wake of the ceasefire in the Gaza Strip, surviving Palestinians returned to homes crushed beyond repair and mourning of lost relatives. 13 Israelis and more than 1300 Palestinians were killed. An estimated 4000 buildings were destroyed. 50.000 Gazans were left homeless, and the areas where Israeli tanks and artillery poured in at the start of the ground war are devastated.